Aspiring MD

Stuff the mind of a hopeful med-student finds interesting.
You can also find me at kessbeebop.tumblr.com

6 exams in 5 days will take it out of you. If you need me, I’ll be sleeping.

Why isn’t it required by law that children get vaccinated?

Because, in general, we acknowledge the sanctity of a person’s bodily autonomy over the desires of the general populace. This isn’t necessarily true in cases of imminent danger (i.e. we will forcibly restrain and confine a person who is a known and immediate danger to the lives of others), but not getting vaccinated doesn’t place other people in immediate jeopardy.

/u/incruente

(via sdsimple)

Hold the phone. I need to soapbox here. Because this made me mad. 

False. Not vaccinating DOES put other people in immediate jeopardy. People with cancer. People will immune deficiencies. People who are old. People who are pregnant. People who are newborns. People with chronic illnesses. This is why mandatory vaccinations have been upheld time and time again in the courts (not in every state, obviously). Not vaccinating impinges on the rights of everyone around you to avoid a preventable illness; as the saying goes, your right to swing your arms around ends at another person’s nose.

Herd immunity works but only to a certain point; X percent of the population has to be vaccinated to prevent a disease from spreading. The more and more unvaccinated healthy people in the ‘herd’ the more dangerous it is for those who cannot be vaccinated. For some vaccines, that threshold is lower, while for others, it is much higher (pertussis, I believe, which requires 80-90% vaccination for effective herd immunity).

Vaccines are the most tested and tightly quality controlled  pharmaceutical out there. They are held to higher standards than literally every other drug people put in their bodies- over the counter drugs like aspirin and antihistamines, antibiotics, diabetes drugs, antidepressants, pain pills, even freaking viagra. They are, obviously, not completely 100% safe, but one’s risk of having an adverse reaction to a vaccine is thousands of times lower than one’s risk of dying in car accident or taking antibiotics- and I don’t see anybody avoiding getting in the car or taking antibiotics for their sore throat. You know where kids are exposed to more heavy metals than what is included in vaccines? Breastmilk. Think about that.

Correlation does not equal causation. Signs of autism can manifest anywhere in the first 18 months of life, coinciding with the MMR vaccine among others. I understand it’s psychologically easier to blame a vaccine for your kid’s autism than the fact that maybe he/she was just born that way and there’s nothing you as the parent did wrong. Come on.

Finally, when people say that vaccine preventable illnesses aren’t that bad, they are wrong. It’s not that bad because they’ve never seen it. I promise that millions of dollars of research and development would not have gone into the creation of a vaccine for an illness that ‘isn’t that bad’. Here is a brief list of the major medical complications (called seqelae in doctorland) of some ‘not that bad’ vaccine preventable illnesses:

- Measles = pneumonia, acute enchephalitis (aka, brain infection), SSPE/subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (aka, you’re probably going to die) and corneal ulceration/scarring (blindness)
- Mumps = spontaneous abortion if in the first trimester, infertility, meningitis, encephalitis
- Rubella = not bad for people who aren’t fetuses; if a pregnant women is infected with rubella, she could miscarry or her baby could be born with congential rubella syndrome (heart, brain, eye, and ear malformations that could leave the baby deaf, blind, mentally retarded, with heart problems to boot).
- Pertussis = particularly devastating for infants and very young children; complications associated with coughing fits so severe they can’t breathe. Rumor has it oxygen is really important.
- Diptheria = again, children are most suceptible. Their throat swells shut and they suffocate. Other possible sequelae include heart infection and peripheral neuropathy.
- Varciella = You mean chicken pox? Yup. A fetus infected with varicella can result in brain, eye, spinal cord and nerve, limb, bladder, and skin malformations. It also sometimes kills babies.
- H. influenzae =  Hib actually kills- in babies and young children it can cause epiglottitis (which can block off the airway and causes death by suffocation), menenigitis, or sepsis (which is infection of the blood and leads to all kinds of bad things mostly culminating in death), or pneumonia (which kills even adults on the regular, much less the little ones).
- HPV = THIS IS A VACCINE AGAINST CANCER WHAT MORE DO YOU WANT. Cervical cancer basically requires infection with the more virulent stains of HPV, the biggest and baddest and most common are in the vaccine.

This is a short and incomplete list.

In summary, while people who don’t vaccinate usually do so because they are trying to do the best thing for their kids- which is admirable- it is actually the opposite of those intentions in reality.

(via aspiringdoctors)

(via aspiringdoctors)

Anonymous asked: Shut the fuck up about vaccinations. Not everyone has to have them, not everyone believes in them. Uneducated fuck.

aspiringdoctors:

image

You know, my homie and secret best friend Neil deGrasse Tyson said it best….

image

This isn’t an issue of belief or should even be up for discussion. It’s not a debate- like gravity or that the Earth revolves around the Sun isn’t up for debate. It’s a fact, whether or not you like it. Sorry bro.

And any ‘educated fuck’ knows that vaccines are necessary and everyone who can have them should have them.

Have a lovely day, sugar. 

Other songs I’ve heard on 2x speed from these lectures today:
- Back in Black by AC/DC
- Timber by Kesha/Pitbull

So I’m sitting here listening to recorded lectures on 2x speed to review some topics, and I forgot that my prof liked to play music during the breaks in lecture.

Turns out Happy by Pharrell Williams is just as catchy on twice the speed but if you try to dance or clap along, you look like an idiot.

medicalschool:

This early stethoscope belonged to Laennec (Science Museum, London)
The stethoscope was invented in France in 1816 by René Laennec at the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris. It consisted of a wooden tube and was monaural. His device was similar to the common ear trumpet, a historical form of hearing aid; indeed, his invention was almost indistinguishable in structure and function from the trumpet, which was commonly called a “microphone”.
The first flexible stethoscope of any sort may have been a binaural instrument with articulated joints not very clearly described in 1829.In 1840, Golding Bird described a stethoscope he had been using with a flexible tube. Bird was the first to publish a description of such a stethoscope but he noted in his paper the prior existence of an earlier design (which he thought was of little utility) which he described as the snake ear trumpet. Bird’s stethoscope had a single earpiece. In 1851, Irish physician Arthur Leared invented a binaural stethoscope, and in 1852 George Cammann perfected the design of the instrument for commercial production, which has become the standard ever since. Cammann also wrote a major treatise on diagnosis by auscultation, which the refined binaural stethoscope made possible. By 1873, there were descriptions of a differential stethoscope that could connect to slightly different locations to create a slight stereo effect, though this did not become a standard tool in clinical practice. Rappaport and Sprague designed a new stethoscope in the 1940s, which became the standard by which other stethoscopes are measured, consisting of two sides, one of which is used for the respiratory system, the other for the cardiovascular system. The Rappaport-Sprague was later made by Hewlett-Packard. HP’s medical products division was spun off as part of Agilent Technologies, Inc., where it became Agilent Healthcare. Agilent Healthcare was purchased by Philips which became Philips Medical Systems, before the walnut-boxed, $300, original Rappaport-Sprague stethoscope was finally abandoned ca. 2004, along with Philips’ brand (manufactured by Andromed, of Montreal, Canada) electronic stethoscope model. The Rappaport-Sprague model stethoscope was heavy and short (18–24 in (46–61 cm)) with an antiquated appearance recognizable by their two large independent latex rubber tubes connecting an exposed-leaf-spring-joined-pair of opposing “f”-shaped chrome-plated brass binaural ear tubes with a dual-head chest piece. Several other minor refinements were made to stethoscopes, until in the early 1960s Dr. David Littmann, a Harvard Medical School professor, created a new stethoscope that was lighter than previous models and had improved acoustics. The Littmann stethoscope is the model used by most medical students today.

medicalschool:

This early stethoscope belonged to Laennec (Science Museum, London)

The stethoscope was invented in France in 1816 by René Laennec at the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris. It consisted of a wooden tube and was monaural. His device was similar to the common ear trumpet, a historical form of hearing aid; indeed, his invention was almost indistinguishable in structure and function from the trumpet, which was commonly called a “microphone”.

The first flexible stethoscope of any sort may have been a binaural instrument with articulated joints not very clearly described in 1829.In 1840, Golding Bird described a stethoscope he had been using with a flexible tube. Bird was the first to publish a description of such a stethoscope but he noted in his paper the prior existence of an earlier design (which he thought was of little utility) which he described as the snake ear trumpet. Bird’s stethoscope had a single earpiece. In 1851, Irish physician Arthur Leared invented a binaural stethoscope, and in 1852 George Cammann perfected the design of the instrument for commercial production, which has become the standard ever since. Cammann also wrote a major treatise on diagnosis by auscultation, which the refined binaural stethoscope made possible. By 1873, there were descriptions of a differential stethoscope that could connect to slightly different locations to create a slight stereo effect, though this did not become a standard tool in clinical practice. Rappaport and Sprague designed a new stethoscope in the 1940s, which became the standard by which other stethoscopes are measured, consisting of two sides, one of which is used for the respiratory system, the other for the cardiovascular system. The Rappaport-Sprague was later made by Hewlett-Packard. HP’s medical products division was spun off as part of Agilent Technologies, Inc., where it became Agilent Healthcare. Agilent Healthcare was purchased by Philips which became Philips Medical Systems, before the walnut-boxed, $300, original Rappaport-Sprague stethoscope was finally abandoned ca. 2004, along with Philips’ brand (manufactured by Andromed, of Montreal, Canada) electronic stethoscope model. The Rappaport-Sprague model stethoscope was heavy and short (18–24 in (46–61 cm)) with an antiquated appearance recognizable by their two large independent latex rubber tubes connecting an exposed-leaf-spring-joined-pair of opposing “f”-shaped chrome-plated brass binaural ear tubes with a dual-head chest piece. Several other minor refinements were made to stethoscopes, until in the early 1960s Dr. David Littmann, a Harvard Medical School professor, created a new stethoscope that was lighter than previous models and had improved acoustics. The Littmann stethoscope is the model used by most medical students today.

(Source: Wikipedia)

irandommomentsdevida said:look up ad-blocker

Y’know what, I totally had that and then had to reinstall chrome and completely forgot about it. Thanks chicky!